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(Photo: Martin Argles/Guardian)

As Sir Howard Hodgkin CBE, Turner prize-winning artist and arguably Britain’s greatest living painter, celebrates his 80th birthday next month, it’s worth reflecting on how much poorer the world would be had he jumped. Frequently pigeonholed as the last great English romantic painter in the vein of Constable and Turner, Hodgkin is more incendiary than that – a sunburst of an artist who exploded counterintuitively from a British visual culture temperamentally uneasy at depicting sensuality or expressing intellectual thoughts.

In a five-star review of new work at Oxford’s Museum of Modern Art in 2010, Guardian critic Jonathan Jones pegged Hodgkin as giddy colourist and daring philosopher in paint. “Ideas, associations, affinities, memories, longings constitute, for Hodgkin, our real experience of the material world,” he wrote.

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Stuart Jeffries
Guardian

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